*Shooting on the Move*
By Mark

I ran across this little tidbit from when I went though Special Response Team training, or SRT. I have changed some of the language to reflect a more generic audience. Most people practice their shooting while standing still at the range, and donít know what it is like to try to move and shoot. Every thing is done very deliberately and NOT on the run. This can be used with a long gun, such as a shotgun or an AR-15, but this movement is more effective with a sub machine gun or pistol. It is more effective in close quarters or close quarter battle, than in the open, but can be effective there too. Of course this is just the fundamentals of movement and building movement has several more elements to be incorporated to be highly effective.
 

LESSON PLAN TITLE: Shooting While Moving

Tactically Advance and Shoot a Target

a. Stand at a low ready
b. Take a large step forward with the week foot
c. Toe touches the ground first then the heel
d. Take a small step forward with the strong foot
e. Stand at a low ready
f. Fire a standard defensive response at a target

Tactically withdraw and Shoot a Target

a. Stand at a low ready
b. Take a large step rearward with the strong foot
c. Toe touches the ground first, then the heel
d. Take a small step rearward with the weak foot
e. Stand at a low ready
f. Fire a standard defensive response at a target

Sidestep and Shoot a Target

a. Stand at a low ready
b. Take a large step with the foot on the side of the desired direction of travel
c. Toe touches the ground first, then the heel
d. Take a small step sideways in the same direction with the other foot
e. Stand at a low ready
f. Fire a standard defensive response at a target

Shoot on the Move

a. Stand at a low ready
b. Upper body is erect
c. Knees are slightly bent
d. Begins moving by stepping off with the rear foot
e. Raise weapon
f. Aim at the target
g. Fire a standard defensive response at a target

I. INTRODUCTION

In a deadly force situation the targets will probably be moving, and so will the officer.  Unless adversaries are toe to toe, stationary gunfights are rare.  The techniques in this lesson plan will allow an officer to be mobile and to effectively hit what he shoots at.

MOVING AND SHOOTING

Ideally an Officer should shoot from the most stable position available. If an area is to be searched, this eliminates all positions except standing.  The standing position allows an Officer to be mobile, yet instantly prepared to shoot. The tactical advance, withdraw, and sidestep allow the Officer to do so.

A. Tactical Advance

In this mode the officer can advance upon an area or threat and do so slowly and methodically. Proceed as follows:

1. Begin at a standing low ready.

2. Take a large step forward with the weak foot.  The toe of the foot touches the ground first, then the heel to prevent any obstruction from causing you to lose your balance.

3. Take a small step forward with the strong foot

4. These movements should put you back into a standing low ready.
 

B. Tactical Withdraw

In this mode the officer can withdraw from an area or threat and do so slowly and methodically.  Proceed as follows:

1.  Begin at a standing low ready.

2. Take a large step rearward with the strong foot.  The toe of the foot touches the ground first, then the heel to prevent any obstruction from causing you to lose your balance.

3. Take a small step rearward with the weak foot.

4. These movements should put you back into a standing low ready.
 

C. Sidestep

Use this movement when you must traverse to the side either towards (or away) from an area or threat.  Proceed as follows:

1. Begin at a standing low ready.

2. Take a large step with the foot on the side of the desired direction of travel. The toe of the foot touches the ground first, then the heel, to prevent any obstruction from causing you to lose your balance.

3. Take a small step sideways in the same direction with the other foot.

4. These movements should put you back into a standing low ready.
 

III.  SHOOTING ON THE MOVE

An Officer who can shoot while on the move has an advantage: mobile firing platform. This technique can be utilized when you lack cover/concealment or when you are moving between cover/concealment, and you need to engage a target. This benefits you because you are a harder target for adversaries to shoot at.

A. Body Position and Movement

1. Assume a low ready position.

2. Isolate the upper body, and remain erect, which creates a stable firing platform.  Do NOT hunch over.

3. Keep the knees slightly bent (fixed); they'll act as shock absorbers.

4. Step off with the rear foot, keeping the knees bent.

5. Keep the feet pointed in direction of movement; do NOT cross your feet.

6. Continue to walk (move) with your knees bent and upper body erect, keeping your head up.

7. Maintain isometric tension on the weapon.

B. Firing

1. Focusing on the sights, shoot only when sights are aligned.  Do NOT attempt to time the shots with any particular part of the movement, or with the cadence of the walk.

2. Engaging Targets

a. Frontal

 Keep upper body erect, engage as you move.

b. Flanking Targets

Upper body remains erect, twist upper body in the direction of target.

(1) When engaging targets to the strong side, attempt to engage them at a point well out in front of you, before reaching 45-degrees. This will prevent your upper body from becoming torqued at the waist and interfering with sight alignment.

(2) If the target is at a 90-degree angle to your strong side, and you are shooting a handgun, fully extend the strong arm and fire from the strong-hand-only position.
 

IV. CONCLUSION

The ability to engage targets while moving makes the shooter more versatile, because the shooter is effective even when he lacks cover and concealment.

Mark


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